Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

BugGuide is a National Moth Week Partner. How to add your National Moth Week 2021 photos. July 17-25.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1145266
Black pecan aphid damage - Melanocallis caryaefoliae

Black pecan aphid damage - Melanocallis caryaefoliae
Clint, El Paso County, Texas, USA
September 25, 2015
An example of a pecan compound leaf heavily damaged by black pecan aphid.

Images of this individual: tag all
Black pecan aphid NYMPH, Melanocallis caryaefoliae - Melanocallis caryaefoliae Black pecan aphid NYMPH, Melanocallis caryaefoliae - Melanocallis caryaefoliae Black pecan aphid damage - Melanocallis caryaefoliae Black pecan aphid damage - Melanocallis caryaefoliae

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Info on black pecan aphid
This information summarizes species description and life cycle as presented in extension publications of four university systems:

IDENTIFICATION:
The black pecan aphid is the only black aphid that attacks pecan foliage. The adult may be various shades of green or black. Nymphs tend to be lighter in color than the adults, especially in spring when the first through fourth instars have little dark pigment. Antennae are pale yellow with small amounts of black on several segments. Eyes are dark red and cornicles are short. In the other two aphid species present on pecan, cornicles are absent or greatly reduced. (Info from: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r609300411.html)

The black pecan aphid is pear-shaped. Nymphs are dark olive-green while adults, which may be winged, are black.
(Info from: http://pecankernel.tamu.edu/pecan_insects/pests/#black )

LIFE CYCLE:
Black pecan aphids overwinter as eggs under the bark of the tree. The eggs hatch in the spring, and the nymphs begin feeding on the leaves. Black pecan aphids are not abundant during the spring, however, and leaf damage is limited. Higher populations capable of causing severe defoliation generally occur from midSeptember until frost. Black pecan aphids have a high reproductive rate – with each aphid capable of producing up to 35 offspring. There are approximately 20 to 30 generations per year.
(Info from: https://www.lsuagcenter.com/NR/rdonlyres/7D1C68BF-DA8E-4745-8BD0-0BF1206C2886/67823/pub3146BlackPecanAphidHIGHRES.pdf )

The black pecan aphid overwinters as an egg in bark crevices. The nymphs hatch in the spring, move to young foliage, and begin to feed. They mature into asexual stem mothers in about a week and begin to produce living young. These offspring in turn mature into asexual females. Many generations (15 to 30) of females are produced per year. The fall forms, wingless females and winged males, begin to appear among the nymphs in October. These forms mate and the females migrate to protected areas of the limbs and trunk and deposit their eggs in cracks.
(Info from: http://entoweb.okstate.edu/ddd/insects/blackpecanaphid.htm)

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.