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Photo#1146076
Ox Beetle - Strategus cessus - female

Ox Beetle - Strategus cessus - Female
Kohl's Ranch, elev ca. 5300 ft., Gila County, Arizona, USA
July 17, 2013
Size: 3.2 cm

Images of this individual: tag all
Rhinoceros Beetle - Strategus cessus - female Ox Beetle - Strategus cessus - female

Moved
Moved from Strategus aloeus.

 
How can you
tell this one is a female? I can't find a good illustration of male vs. female.

 
Pic of a male
http://bugguide.net/node/view/228708/bgimage

Seems that males have deeper and wider depression on the pronotum, but not sure if this is a reliable characteristic to separate the gender.

 
Thanks much
It also looks like the male has one narrower, sharper bump where the female has one broad ridge on the head where the "horns" are. I also see two small bumps more forward on the male's "face". Sorry I don't know the proper terminology.

This is Strategus cessus.
It is black rather than "castaneus" as Strategus aloeus is often called. The tiny "horn" probably indicates that this is a male, but looking at the last abdominal segment (aka sternite) is the right way to tell. This species is found over most of New Mexico and Arizona, usually at elevations of above 2000 feet.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Thank you
Blaine. I must keep looking for a male.

Is this
Xyloryctes thestalus?

 
Strategus sp.
*

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