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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#114771
Ant-like Stone Beetle? - Nisaxis

Ant-like Stone Beetle? - Nisaxis
Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA
June 1, 2007
Size: ~2-3 mm
Sorry about the photo. At a light.

Images of this individual: tag all
Ant-like Stone Beetle? - Nisaxis Ant-like Stone Beetle? - Nisaxis

Moved
Moved from Decarthron.

Nisaxis sp.
Probably N. tomentosa - by far the most common species along the coast from east Texas to New Jersey. This one has always bothered me - the two genera are best separated by the presence/absence of vertexal foveae, which isn't very clear in the two photos - but they do look to be absent. The two genera are pretty close in appearance, but this does look to be a bit narrower in the body form than for Decarthron, so Nisaxis I think is the best placement, N. tomentosa if you feel bold - the apical end of the male abdomen must be in clear focus to be sure. This species is common in the Houston area.

Thanks
.

I think a
Decarthron sp., but I can't really tell for sure. There are a number of species in Texas.

 
Thanks
do you think I should move it there?

 
Took
another look, and Decarthron is a good/the best placement, so "yes."

note the short elytra
. . .tell, it is Pselaphinae.

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