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Photo#1161064
Mrs. Neoxylocopa (ventral) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female

Mrs. Neoxylocopa (ventral) - Xylocopa varipuncta - Female
Tonopah Desert, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA
May 18, 2015
Size: 26mm
These are images of a Large Carpenter Bee in the subgenus Neoxylocopa, that I believe is most likely a female Valley Carpenter Bee, Xylocopa varipuncta.
Full Size Image: Click Here
ID Info:
Keying to Subgenera of Genus Xylocopa: (Minckley 1998) (DiscoverLife.org)
Here is a link to the Key, from the Biodiversity Heritage Library website: A Cladistic Analysis and Classification of the Subgenera and Genera of the Large Carpenter Bees, Tribe Xylocopini (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
(New World Females)
1. - Pygidial plate with lateral margins not marked by numerous spines and not strongly divergent anteriorly, sometimes represented by a spine that often has a shorter preapical spine on each side of its base and thus not or scarcely represented on disc of T6 (fig. 7B) = 3
3. - Medial longitudinal carina on all metasomal sterna; clypeus usually bounded by continuous impunctate ridge = 4
4. - Upper tooth of mandible as wide as or narrower than lower tooth (fig.1A) [southern South America to southwestern United States, introduced on Hawaii and Guam]= Subgenus Neoxylocopa Michener 1954
Species Level Info:
This subgenus has two species represented in North America, but in Arizona, X. mexicanorum is restricted to the southern areas, near the border with Mexico and they are unlikely to be found here.
Hind Leg Spines:
The two tibial spines on each hind leg are nearly equal in length. However, the posterior-pointing spines are somewhat curved, bent or wavy looking, in longitudinal profile. (one long arc at the base, connected to one short arc at the tip)
In contrast, the front-pointing or ventro-lateral spines are very straight. I'm not yet sure that this is a unique character trait, at the species, subspecies or regional variety level, but I haven't seen an exact match of them, on any other bee's images, so far. (very hard to see)

Images of this individual: tag all
Mrs. Neoxylocopa (ventral) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female Mrs. Neoxylocopa (ventral head) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female Mrs. Neoxylocopa (ventral abdomen) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female Mrs. Neoxylocopa (ventral hind-leg) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female Mrs. Neoxylocopa (dorsal) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female Mrs. Neoxylocopa (dorsal head) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female Mrs. Neoxylocopa (dorsal abdomen) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female Mrs. Neoxylocopa (wing) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female Mrs. Neoxylocopa (dorsal sunlit) - Xylocopa varipuncta - female

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Valley Girl
John, the "Browse" function for this species seems to be locked on the same six images. I have also noticed this for another species in the genus Agapostemon.
I'm assuming that this is a technical glitch and "someone" should be notified. Thanks for helping!

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