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Species Scellus virago

Western dolichopodid from alkaline Fish Slough habitat  - Scellus virago - male Western dolichopodid from alkaline Fish Slough habitat  - Scellus virago - male Western dolichopodid from alkaline Fish Slough habitat  - Scellus virago - male Western dolichopodid from alkaline Fish Slough habitat  - Scellus virago - male
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon (Orthorrhapha)
Superfamily Empidoidea
Family Dolichopodidae (Longlegged Flies)
Subfamily Hydrophorinae
Genus Scellus
Species virago (Scellus virago)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Scellus virago Aldrich, 1907
Explanation of Names
"Female warrior"; females take the lead in courtship.
Identification
Aldrich's original 1907 description can be read at this BHL link.
Range
Western USA
Habitat
Often found in salt and alkali flats.
Remarks
The "cingulum" is a distinctive structure associated with male Scellus. It is a "U"-shaped structure that girdles the underside of the abdomen (hidden there beneath the 4th sternite), and then emerges externally from between the 4th & 5th tergites as a pair of lateral, ribbon-like (or in some species filiform) appendages called "signum" (plural: signa). The cingulum is discussed on the 2nd page of this PDF by Justin Runyon, and in the post below:

 
Print References
Aldrich, J.M. (1907). The dipterous genus Scellus, with one new species. Entomological News 18:133–136. (Full Text)
Doane, R. W. (1907). Notes on the habits of Scellus virago Ald., Entomological News 18:136–138. (Full Text)
Greene, C. T. (1924). Synopsis of the North American flies of the genus Scellus. Proc. U.S. natn. Mus. 65 (16): l-18. (Full Text)
Harmston, F. C. (1939). A new Scellus (Dolichopodidae: Diptera) with key to males. Proc. Utah Acad. Sci. 16: 71-73.
Hurley, R.L. (1995). Orthogenya Dolichopodidae: Hydrophorinae. In G.C.D. Griffiths (editor), Flies of the Nearctic region 6 (2): 113–224.
Van Duzee, Millard C (1925). Scellus virago Aldrich (A two-winged fly) and two forms closely related to it. Proc. Calif. Acad. Sci. (4) 14: 175-183 (Full Text)