Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico, July 20-24

National Moth Week was July 23-31, 2022! See moth submissions.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Photos of insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12


Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinks
Books
Data

Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps

 
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
next page
last page

Trap-nesting wasps and bees: life histories, nests, and associates
By Krombein K.V.
Smithsonian Press, Washington, DC. vi+570 pp., 1967

Wasps: Their Biology, Diversity, and Role as Beneficial Insects and Pollinators of Native Plants
By Heather N. Holm
Pollination Press LLC; First edition, 2021

The Sting of the Wild: The Story of the Man Who Got Stung for Science
By Justin O. Schmidt
John Hopkins University Press: Baltimore, MD, 2016
This book is useful in dispelling myths about broad groups (particularly the oft-maligned Mutillidae). The Appendix contains the rankings for 83 species and includes all ranked species. It's also worth noting that this does mean that the majority of species are unranked, so caution should be taken in creating sweeping claims (as often done on rather erroneous Internet memes).

Molecular phylogenetics of Vespoidea indicate paraphyly of the superfamily...
By Pilgrim E.M., von Dohlen C.D., Pitts J.P.
Zoologica Scripta 37: 539–560, 2008
Full title: Molecular phylogenetics of Vespoidea indicate paraphyly of the superfamily and novel relationships of its component families and subfamilies

Abstract

Identifying the sister group to the bees: a molecular phylogeny of Aculeata with an emphasis on the superfamily Apoidea
By Debevec A.H., Cardinal S., Danforth B.N.
Zoologica Scripta 41: 527-535, 2012

A First Florida Record and Note on the Nesting of Trypoxylon (Trypargilum) texense Saussure (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae)
By Frank E. Kurczewski
The Florida Entomologist Vol. 46, No. 3, pp. 243-245, 1963

Coleopterofauna asociada a detritos de Atta mexicana (F. Smith) ... en dos localidades del noite de Morelo, Mexico.
By Marquez-Luna, J.
Tesis profesional, Fac. de Ciencias, UNAM. Mexico, D.F. 134 pp., 1994
Marquez-Luna, J. 1994. Coleopterofauna asociada a detritos de Atta mexicana (F. Smith) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) en dos localidades del norte de Morelos, Mexico. Tesis profesional, Fac. de Ciencias, UNAM. Mexico, D.F. 134 pp.

Marquez-Luna (1994) reported 23 permanent species of beetles (in eight families) that existed in three Atta mexicana ant refuse dumps from northern Morelos, Mexico.

Laphetux sp. (Cerylonidae)

Epiglyptus costatus (Histeridae)
Hister sp.
Phelister sp.
Pseudister rufulus
Xestipyge multistriatum

Oosternum attacomis (Hydrophilidae)

Long-term effects of the invasion of an arthropod community by the imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.
By Morrison, L.W.
Ecology, 83(8): 2337-2345., 2002
Full PDF

Morrison, L.W. 2002. Long-term effects of the invasion of an arthropod community by the imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Ecology, 83(8): 2337-2345.

Abstract

Invasive ant species represent a serious threat to the integrity of many ecological communities, often causing decreases in the abundance and species richness of both native ants and other arthropods. One of the most in-depth and well-known studies of this type documented a severe impact of the imported red fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, on the native ant and arthropod fauna of a biological field reserve in central Texas (USA) during the initial invasion in the late 1980s. I sampled the community again in 1999, 12 years later, utilizing the same methodology, to compare the short- and long-term impacts of this invasion. Pitfall traps and baits were used to obtain quantitative measures of the ant and arthropod community, and hand collecting was additionally employed to determine the overall ant species composition. Although the abundance and species richness of native ants and several other arthropod groups decreased precipitously immediately after the S. invicta invasion, all measures of native ant and arthropod species diversity had returned to preinvasion levels after 12 years. Solenopsis invicta was still the most abundant ant species, but not nearly as abundant as it was during the initial phase of the invasion. The results of this study indicate that the impact of such invasive ants may be greatest during and shortly after the initial phase of an invasion.

 
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
next page
last page