Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information about the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1173258
Bumble Bee or mimic? - Bombus nevadensis - male

Bumble Bee or mimic? - Bombus nevadensis - Male
Edgewood, BC, British Columbia, Canada
July 16, 2015
I believe I thought this was a carpenter bee when I photographed it because it wasn't acting like a bumble bee. Now I see that carpenter bees have hairless abdomens, so I don't know what to think. I appreciate any expertise that can be lent to this one!

Moved
Moved from Bumble Bees.

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Bombus nevadensis male?
Bombus nevadensis male?



(also, I don't think any of the Xylocopa carpenter bees get up into the WA/BC area; X. californica and X. tabaniformis stop in OR)

 
could be
B. rufocinctus is the other species to consider

 
True... I feel like the commo
True... I feel like the common name of rufocinctus is incorrect, it should be renamed "The Great Imitator"!

 
That seems likely!
I was looking into male bumble bees earlier today, so that might be it. I have seen Bombus nevadensis in the area, but not at the site I saw the above individual.

Knowing what it is now, it is interesting to note that they exhibit territorial behaviour. I see now that this has been researched - see here if you're interested: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/z91-090

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.