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Pandemic dengue in Caribbean countries and the southern United States — Past, present and potential problems.
By Ehrenkranz et al.
The New England Journal of Medicine 285: 1460-1469., 1971
Cite: 1179544 with citation markup [cite:1179544]
N Engl J Med

N. Joel Ehrenkranz, M.D., Arnoldo K. Ventura, Ph.D., Raul R. Cuadrado, Dr.P.H., William L. Pond, Ph.D., and John E. Porter, Ph.D. 1971. Pandemic Dengue in Caribbean Countries and the Southern United States — Past, Present and Potential Problems. The New England Journal of Medicine 285: 1460-1469.

THE outbreaks of dengue in the Caribbean area in 1963–64 and 1968–691 have served as reminders of the continuing presence of dengue in the Western Hemisphere, and the threat of recurrence of epidemic dengue in the southern United States. Since the first Caribbean pandemic in 1827, epidemics have been regularly reported in this region (Table 1). Their undiminished frequency, despite an increasing knowledge of causative viruses, disease vectors and means of prevention, must be taken as prima facie evidence of insufficient knowledge for effective long-term control or inadequate application of existing knowledge (or both).