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Photo#1181019
Leptoglossus nymph - Leptoglossus

Leptoglossus nymph - Leptoglossus
Brookside Gardens, Montgomery County, Maryland, USA
September 13, 2015
Size: 17-18mm
The shape of the hind tibial “leaves” rules out Acanthocephala and I think most species of Leptoglossus that would be found in Maryland. I suspect that this one is either L. oppositus or maybe L. phyllopus but I’m not sure these photos are enough to nail down the species in a late stage nymph.

If it’s possible to take this one to species, I’d appreciate the help. TIA.

Images of this individual: tag all
Leptoglossus nymph - Leptoglossus Leptoglossus nymph - Leptoglossus

Can't really tell the differece though...
L. oppositus


L. phyllopus


Well... from the color of antennae etc., maybe oppositus? Not sure...

 
the color does fit
but I don't know that it's diagnostic. I’d be confident that this was L. oppositus if I was sure that the following logic applied to late stage nymphs: The key to Leptoglossus adults in this paper (1) splits the path to L. phyllopus and L. oppositus at the second couplet depending on whether or not the labium extends well onto the abdomen (it does in L. oppositus and doesn’t/barely it in L. phyllopus). The labium in this nymph clearly extends well past the junction of the thorax and abdomen. I really don't know if that's enough to call this one L. oppositus.

L. oppositus


L. phyllopus

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