Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

2018 BugGuide Gathering in Virginia July 27-29: Registration and Discussion

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1183167
Coccinellidae - Tytthaspis? - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata

Coccinellidae - Tytthaspis? - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata
Tinicum , Delaware County, Pennsylvania, USA
June 17, 2015
Size: 4.14 mm
This doesn't seem to key to any North American genus. However it does resemble Tytthaspis sedecimpunctata from Europe. Considering I collected it adjacent to the Philadelphia International Airport, and immediately adjacent to the UPS hub, which gets a number of European flights, it wouldn't be out the real of possibilities.

Images of this individual: tag all
Coccinellidae - Tytthaspis? - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata Coccinellidae - Tytthaspis? - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata Coccinellidae - Tytthaspis? - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata Coccinellidae - Tytthaspis? - Propylea quatuordecimpunctata

Moved
Moved from Lady Beetles.

Hi Russell
I don't think this is Tytthaspis on these points:

1. pronotum pattern. The basal markings on this specimen are very squared, while in Tytthaspis these markings are triangular and/or very sloping with bias towards the scutellum.

2. marking pattern. Tytthaspis has 2 columns of markings. The non-confluent form of that species has a central column of 3-4 spots, and an outer column of 4-5 markings. Your ladybug has 3 columns of markings, with only 2-3 markings in each.

3. the head is entirely white. Tytthaspis has a primarily black head, sometimes with a white patch or markings.

_______________

I would refer this specimen to the light form of Propylea quatuordecimpunctata. This is a fairly common form most often occurring in females, but not unknown from males either. All points match that sp.

Tytthaspis has never been recorded in NA to my knowledge, but it likes disturbed roadside habitats and also occurs in rural to sub-urban areas, so it is perhaps the next expected European Coccinellid colonizer to the US besides Psyllobora vigintiduomaculata (which was recently recorded, actually).

Hope this helps.

 
Yes, I see your points. I col
Yes, I see your points. I collected a number of P. quatuordecimpunctata at this location the past summer and this specimen would be the only one that appeared markedly different from the others, which threw me off. Thanks for the assistance.

 
Keep an eye out
Tytthaspis is bound to show up in NA eventually.

You're welcome Russell.

if it is...
it should probably be moved to 'Accidental Adventives' unless there is documented evidence it occurs in N.A. Wait for expert review.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.