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Photo#119498
Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - male - female

Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - Male Female
Mt. Washington, Coos County, New Hampshire, USA
June 8, 2007
Size: about 2.7 mm
I found twelve of these little cholevines beneath some cracked, loose bark on a fir log directly on top of which was an old scat composed mainly of mouse hair and bones. They ran helter-skelter when I exposed them and I was very active with my homemade pooter for a minute sucking them up. These two appear to be male and female, the male having expanded tarsi on both front and middle legs. I've included other individuals in this photo series since they all came from the same square foot of log.

All but one of these little beetles appeared to die during the photo shoot despite frequent water misting. I put ten directly into 95% alcohol at the end of shooting that batch of beetles. Margaret Thayer had requested some Catops preserved thusly for DNA sequencing but I think these are too small to be that genus. I may send them along anyway in case backups are needed of whatever genus this turns out to be. I have all twelve, so if anyone else would like some, now is the time to ask.

This is the first of many species I collected on Mt. Washington in company with Tom Murray searching for the extremely rare Py*tho stric*tus, last reported there well over 100 years ago.

Images of this individual: tag all
Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - male - female Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - female Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - female Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - female Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - male Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - female Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - female Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - female Small Carrion Beetle - Catops paramericanus - female

Moved

Catops?
Thanks for the link to your cholevine photos. Although I don't know the genera well off the top of my head, looking at Peck's key in American Beetles, it looks like those probably are Catops, provided the elytra have a "granular surface of irregularly arranged setal bases; strigae absent" instead of "glossy surface, setal bases arranged in transverse or oblique strigae (Fig. 1.19)" (as in Tom Murray's Nemadus photo http://bugguide.net/node/view/52453). I can't quite make out in the dorsal and lateral photos what the surface is like, but think it is more Catops-like than Nemadus-like. The expanded male pro- and mesotarsi are characteristic of the subtribe Catopina, to which Catops belongs.

Peck and Cook revised Catops in a paper on the tribe Cholevini (2002, Canadian Entomologist 134: 723-787), and we have a lot of material here identified by Peck. There is, in fact, a small species they described in that paper, Catops paramericanus, that's in that size range (2.1-3.3 mm in their description), and here are the two NH localities in our collection: Coos Co., 3.1 mi S Jefferson Notch, 630 m; Grafton Co., Zealand R., 2200 ft, 6 mi SE Twin Mtn. It's a widespread species and was previously confused with C. americanus but has a few morphological differences from C. a. and is more boreal as well.

Margaret Thayer, PhD
Field Museum
Chicago

 
Catops - yes!
Jim, now that I've received the specimens I was able to check the ID in Peck & Cook's revision that I mentioned before. They do indeed appear to be Catops paramericanus Peck & Cook, 2002 as I had suspected from your photos. Thanks very much for the specimens!

 
Excellent!
Thanks for IDing them to species for me.

I ran MV lights Monday and Tuesday seeking a couple other of your Beetle Tree of Life desiderata but no luck yet. Tonight would have been perfect but I had to get some sleep and get ready for a week on Mt. Washington, leaving Friday.

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