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Photo#1209632
mating flies - Myopa rubida - male - female

mating flies - Myopa rubida - Male Female
Cedar Canyon Road, Mojave National Preserve, San Bernardino County, California, USA
March 27, 2016

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mating flies - Myopa rubida - male - female mating flies - Myopa rubida - male - female mating flies - Myopa rubida - male - female

Moved
Moved from Myopa.

Joyce, I first saw these yesterday and have been researching & thinking about the ID...based mainly on Camras(1953).

The main key characters Camras uses point to M. rubida here: abdomen shiny red; abdominal hairs short, sparse, and black; abdomen with virtually no pollen (= patches of fine powdery, "bloom"...not flower pollen! :-).

The only character that doesn't fit Camras' circumscription of "typical rubida" is that the 1st posterior cell here is closed at its apex. But in that regard, Camras states rubida has 1st posterior cell "almost always open"...and thus the wiggle-room tern "almost" leaves leeway for this situation.

The closest other possibility is M. clausa which has 1st posterior cell "almost always closed"...but has pollinose patches on the abdomen "moderate in extent" and "distinct from unmarked areas". But, in accord with the description of rubida, your photos show no pollinosity on the abdomen (the pale areas in the 3rd photo are apparently due to reflections).

PS: Nice documentation of the interesting "arm-waving behavior" of the male. Alice also photographed arm-waving in the courtship behavior of some of the Ablautus she found (different family, but still Diptera :-).

 
Myopa rubida
Thanks Aaron!!!

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