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Photo#12153
Dot-tailed Whiteface - Leucorrhinia intacta - female

Dot-tailed Whiteface - Leucorrhinia intacta - Female
near Ailsa Craig, North Middlesex, Ontario, Canada
June 4, 2004
Paul Pratt of the Ontario Odonata site identified this as a teneral Dot-tailed but he didn't mention whether it was a young male or female.

Images of this individual: tag all
Dot-tailed Whiteface - Leucorrhinia intacta - female Dot-tailed Whiteface - Leucorrhinia intacta - female Dot-tailed Whiteface - Leucorrhinia intacta - female

Dot-tailed Whiteface
This is a female, not only no claspers, but for this species the males only have a yellow spot at the end - segment 7 - not all the way down the abdomen.


David Bree
Bloomfield, ON

 
teneral males
...have spots all the way down the abdomen, as shown here but all the spots (except the most distal one) disappear within a few days following emergence, according to Paul Pratt. This male is in the process of losing his spots.

 
Dot-tailed Whiteface
Good to know about the spots disappearing. The photo you reference shows it nicely. Thanks

claspers
We would think the claspers would be evident in this image if the animal were male even though it is an immature. Males have long appendages at the tip of their abdomen which they use to hold the female behind the head. Yours does not. We would say your image is of a female.

 
female
Thanks, John; I see the difference now, after looking again at the chaparraltree photo I linked to.

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