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Photo#1217215
Pseudoscorpion

Pseudoscorpion
Block Island, Washington County, Rhode Island, USA
April 30, 2016
A nice birthday present for me – a pseudoscorpion under driftwood on Scotch Beach! Currently, the beach is sandy in the intertidal zone with a rocky band (~10 feet wide) just beyond the reach of the waves. Beyond that is some sand (maybe 20-30 feet) and then dunes covered with beach rose (Rosa rugosa) and American beach grass (Ammophila breviligulata). In front of the dunes are American searocket (Cakile edentula) beach heather (Hudsonia tomentosa), and other small plants common in such habitats, which are just beginning to grow for the season. I suspect this is Epactiochernes tristis, which has been recorded on beaches from Long Island to Massachusetts.

To be sent to Charles Stephen for voucher identification.

Images of this individual: tag all
Pseudoscorpion Pseudoscorpion Pseudoscorpion

I've never seen it, but there
I've never seen it, but there is a record for Parobisium hesperum from Cannon Beach in Oregon.

Moved
Moved from Pseudoscorpions.

Wish I knew of someone...
BugGuide is lacking in identified pseudoscorpions. I think in most cases they need to be slide-mounted. Will ask around again.

Reminds me of this one from the west coast:

 
Thanks
I've brought it with me back to the mainland in a 1.5ml micro-centrifuge tube with a few springtails and a mite. It's a pretty entertaining pet. I'm thinking it's a Chernetid but it goes without saying that I'm not sure and would love to get an ID if possible. If no one will take it I'm at least going to try to figure out how to get it to stay still upside down to get a good ventral shot and maybe even manage to get a shot of the chela (though I really don't know how I'd manage that.) Having some full color live images of pseudoscorpions identified to species, which there don't seem to be too many of, would I think make (tentative) non-expert identification much more accessible.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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