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Photo#1228483
Bold Jumping Spider - Phidippus audax - Phidippus audax

Bold Jumping Spider - Phidippus audax - Phidippus audax
Warren, Rhode Island 02885, Bristol County, Rhode Island, USA
May 25, 2016
Size: ~5/8"
This is on the inside screen, on north side of house. The room is sparse, I would think
there's not much prey. Should I take it outdoors into flower garden?

Images of this individual: tag all
Bold Jumping Spider - Phidippus audax - Phidippus audax Bold Jumping Spider - Phidippus audax - Phidippus audax Bold Jumping Spider - Phidippus audax - Phidippus audax

Moved
Moved from ID Request. Taking it out may provide more food or increase the chance of predation. I'm not sure you can make a wrong choice there.

 
Bold Jumping Spider - Should I release it outside?
Thank you very much Chad, for your reply. I considered the plus and minus of each choice, and I decided to release it in a small flower garden which I intentionally attend very casually. It's a patch of low wild grasses, clover and other low to the ground weeds. This patch also has a large rock and medium-sized piece of driftwood.

My decision was based on my thinking and feeling that's it's better off in a natural setting. Wandering on the inside of a screen for who knows how long, with no chance of escape, seems to me as resulting in a high probability of death by starvation. To me, this would result in a wasted life which rarely happens to a species in its natural habitat. Inside, it would not provide food for a predator, nor have the ability to be the predator it is, hunting other insects/spiders that abound outside. Also, the chance for reproduction would be highly unlikely inside.

If my patch is unsuitable, it can wander off to one that is. I'm assuming Jumping Spiders have evolved to live outside? My neighborhood has grape arbors, wild flower gardens and flowers purchased for their beauty. Across a not too busy road is a huge cemetery: lots of places to jump on potential prey there.

So now it is out in the natural world, complete with the risks and opportunities that await. Upon release, it immediately hid under some low-growing weeds. A good start in a new environment.

This large Jumping Spider is
This large Jumping Spider is on the inside screen of a window on the northern side
of the house. I don't see any obvious way for it to get in or out. May have traveled
inside and into that room, which is sparse.
Question: Should I take it outside and place in a flower garden? Photo #3 has some
sunlight on it as window is N/NW and sun was setting.
… Marcia Sessions, 26 May, 2016 - 12:12pm