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Photo#125148
summit carabid - Calosoma frigidum

summit carabid - Calosoma frigidum
Mt. Washington, Coos County, New Hampshire, USA
June 8, 2007
Size: about 25 mm
Nabbed this big, frisky carabid on the wall of the observation deck of the Mt. Washington Meteorological Observatory during an unusually calm and balmy day atop the peak known for the "world's worst weather." This looks like Calosoma frigidum to me but I'd like a second or third opinion.

A twenty-year veteran staffer in the observatory building says there are usually four or five days a year there with similar weather conditions when many insects swarm to the summit looking for sex partners. Last year, however, there were a great many calm days and this
hilltop lekking was a regular occurence.

I think this beetle was the only carabid I saw in an hour or so of serendipitous collecting there. Although carabids are generaly hardy, this beetle did not fare well in the fridge and was not able to give me an alert pose in the light arena. Here the beetle has died and been posed in silica gel crystals to rapid-dry it in more-or-less the position I wanted.

Finding this and a great many other species was a collateral benefit from our search for Pytho strictus, the lost beetle of Mt. Washington.

Images of this individual: tag all
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Jim
please check your hilltop lekking link.
I hit it and this message popped up: Edit - You are not authorized to access this page.

 
fixed :-)
Thanks, Jeff.

Moved
Moved from Calosoma. The species name on bugguide is frigidum but shouldn't it be frigida in order to have gender agreement with Calosoma?

 
gender . . .
in genus names is a difficult field, compare some words I left here:

 
Soma is Greek for body.
Frigidum has to be Latin for cold. Maybe both words are neuter.

any reason why it is not on species page?
:-)

 
I was waiting for your opinion
:-)

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