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Photo#1253533
Pennsylvania Moth for ID - Hypatopa vestaliella

Pennsylvania Moth for ID - Hypatopa vestaliella
Off Rt. 183 near Appalachian Trail, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA
July 6, 2016
Size: 8-10mm
On a sheet with UV black light. I have recalled seeing this species only the last 2 seasons, perhaps at least a dozen times. It has defied ID. I have seen it at home and in various places in the county. I don't know, it seems a have a peculiar quality of being some introduced or invasive species.

Images of this individual: tag all
Pennsylvania Moth for ID - Hypatopa vestaliella Pennsylvania Moth for ID - Hypatopa vestaliella Pennsylvania Moth for ID - Hypatopa vestaliella

Moved
Moved from Scavenger Moths.

 
good one!
I figured, blastobasically, that this moth would not be identified within, say, my lifetime. Nice work!

Moved

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Blastobasid
This looks to be a blastobasid, I don't know which one. One way to find out whether or not it belongs to that family would be to collect an example and see if it has transverse rows of spines on the dorsum of the abdomen, as shown here.

It is hard to say if this is a recent introduction from somewhere else. That is certainly possible, given the pattern that you describe, but some microlep spp. are notorious for showing up for a couple of years in an area where they have never been seen previously, and then disappearing again. It would be interesting to know if anyone else has noticed this moth for the first time during the past couple of years.

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