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Photo#1267154
Day flying moth - Androloma maccullochii

Day flying moth - Androloma maccullochii
Lightening Lakes Day Use Area, E. C. Manning Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
July 27, 2016
Size: 15 mm in length
Moth feeding at pearly everlasting flowers. On other photos it shows that the moth has several (4 in total) narrow bands of orange hairs on its legs - at first I thought they were orchid pollinaria.

Images of this individual: tag all
Day flying moth - Androloma maccullochii Day flying moth - Androloma maccullochii Day flying moth - Androloma maccullochii

Moved

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Moved per Libby Avis ID.

Macculloch's Forester - Androloma maccullochii
Great shots!

 
Distinguishing characteristic?
Hello: Thanks for the quick id. I had a look in "Insects of the Pacific Northwest" by Peter and Judy Haggard. They have a moth, Alypia ridingsii, Riding's Forester that also seems to fit the description of what was posted. How is that moth distinguished from Macculloch's Forester? Thanks for any additional tips for id to species!

 
Yes, they're very similar!
Check out the link below to the Pacific Northwest Moth Site's description of A. maccullochi. It explains the differences between the two species:
http://pnwmoths.biol.wwu.edu/browse/family-noctuidae/subfamily-agaristinae/androloma/androloma-maccullochii/

You got a couple of great photos of the legs which were really useful in confirming the ID. You can clearly see the the orange tibia of BOTH the front leg and the middle leg. In ridingsii only the middle leg is orange and the front leg is completely black. You can also clearly see the ringed antennae (black in ridingsii); plus the black veins across the white sections on the hind wings are quite pronounced - they're fainter in ridingsii.

 
Thanks so much...
for the summary of how to distinguish between the two species. I think this is a very pretty moth, certainly it is the first time I have ever seen it.

 
As well there are distinctive
As well there are distinctive shoulder pads on the mcculloch's Forester that aren't there for the other :-)

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