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Photo#127756

"Mosquito Hawk" is a Crane Fly, Santa Clara County, CA. - Tipula oleracea - Male
Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, California, USA
July 15, 2007
It appears to be eating some kind of insect...(Guess not!)

Here is a link to a similar looking, female crane fly that I would not be surprised to find out is a member of the same species:


Images of this individual: tag all
Mosquito Hawk, Santa Clara County, CA. - Tipula oleracea - male Mosquito Hawk, Santa Clara County, CA. - Tipula oleracea Mosquito Hawk, Santa Clara County, CA. - Tipula oleracea

Moved
Moved from Crane Flies.

Nope...
it ain't eating anything. This is a Crane Fly, family Tipulidae. Most species are non-feeding as adults. What you thought may have been an insect is actually the fly's elongated rostrum, which has long palps. You can clearly see this feature in this image:
By the way, this is a male, as the blunt abdomen suggests (female have pointed abdomens).
Chen Young, our crane fly expert, will be able to tell you more about what species this is.

 
Thanks for the info, Stephen
It seems likely that I was wrong about its eating activities. I thought I saw a pair eyes on what I thought was it's meal, but I guess not!

The common lore is that these prey on mosquitoes, so this new information came as a surprise!

 
Here is a link to a female crane fly found in the same ..
...area a few days later. There appear to be similarities, maybe they are the same species.

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