Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information about the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1280195
Priocnemis hestia (?) with Xysticus sp. prey - Dipogon calipterus - female

Priocnemis hestia (?) with Xysticus sp. prey - Dipogon calipterus - Female
Washington Crossing, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, USA
August 20, 2016
Size: ~8 mm
I noticed this small wasp frantically dragging its prey about. Black wing bands with whitish wing tip seems distinctive for P. hestia.

Images of this individual: tag all
Priocnemis hestia (?) with Xysticus sp. prey - Dipogon calipterus - female Priocnemis hestia (?) with Xysticus sp. prey - Dipogon calipterus - female Spider Wasp with Xysticus sp. prey - Xysticus - male

Moved
Moved from Dipogon pulchripennis. Identified as D. calipterus from photos by Frank Kurczewski. Key characters are wing venation and leg color. For comparison see BG photo #s 792839 et seq.

Moved
Moved from Dipogon.

Notes on Dipogon vs. Priocnemis from Frank Kurczewski
"The key characteristic is Dipogon females grasp the spider by the spinnerets at the end of the abdomen and pull it backwards, whereas species of Priocnemis grasp the base of a leg and drag the spider backwards, often in an upright position." "...the spider may be a species of Xysticus, the common prey genus of many species of Dipogon. Priocnemis hestia is quite small (6 – 7 mm) and uncommon in the field and in collections. Priocnemis hestia has been collected with prey only once in the 1950s, that being a species of Agroeca (Liocranidae)."

Moved
Moved from Spider Wasps. ID suggested by Frank Kurczewski (see above comment).

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.