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Photo#1280459
Cream-Streaked Lady Beetle  - Harmonia quadripunctata

Cream-Streaked Lady Beetle - Harmonia quadripunctata
Swampscott, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
August 22, 2016

Images of this individual: tag all
Cream-Streaked Lady Beetle  - Harmonia quadripunctata Cream-Streaked Lady Beetle  - Harmonia quadripunctata

"Four-spotted ladybeetle"
is not a recognized name for this species. The name in use across the world is cream-streaked ladybeetle in reference to the pale vertical stripes. For consistency we should use that too. I'm guessing whoever created the page made this new name based on the species epithet.

 
Changed
thanks.

Moved

Wow!
This is Harmonia quadripunctata! There are only a couple of records of this species in North America, and none for almost two decades.

Note the broader body form compared to Mulsantina, as well as a narrower head with eyes much closer together. Compared to M. picta the pattern is actually quite different throughout (except for the head, with which the pattern is sometimes shared). Unlike Mulsantina this species has several shades of brown rather than just a plain uniform colouration, as well as a pale outer margin surrounding the elytra.

Fantastic find.

 
Thanks!
That's quite interesting.

In the same small pine grove where I saw this lady beetle, I previously saw a yellow one (a couple years before) and assumed it was M. Picta: . Is this correct, or is it another H. quadripunctata?

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