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Photo#129526
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail For Illinois In July - Papilio glaucus - male

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail For Illinois In July - Papilio glaucus - Male
Norris City, White County, Illinois, USA
July 23, 2007
Finally, one of these came down from tree-top level and landed in my back yard. It only gave me a few seconds to try and get this shot, but at least it's wings were open. This is the best shot I've ever gotten of one of these elusive, (for me) butterflies, and I was grateful!

Update - This photo was originally posted yesterday, but today I had the opportunity of all opportunities and saw one just flitting from one clover blossom to the next, and then just sitting there with it's wings open for extended periods of time. I have to say that these are the most elusive butterflies to photograph for me and I've been trying for about a year and a half to get a shot like this. Ron, you were sure right on this one! It was just such a great big, beautiful butterfly, it almost took my breath away.

Good going!
Bet the next one will be much easier.

 
You're Absolutely Right!
The next one came a little later in the afternoon! But, it was heavily chewed on one wing.

 
There's been a rash of that
The Admiral I posted the other day was gnawed on both wings, but it had the good grace to fold them decorously for its photo. Four of five blues I saw today were also missing wing hunks. Dratted birds!

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