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Species Nemoria unitaria - Single-lined Emerald - Hodges#7018

Nemoria mimosaria - Nemoria unitaria Single-lined Emerald - Nemoria unitaria - male Nemoria unitaria? - Nemoria unitaria Something in the Geometridae Family? - Nemoria unitaria Single-lined Emerald - Nemoria unitaria Single-lined Emerald - Nemoria unitaria Single-lined Emerald - Nemoria unitaria Nemoria? - Nemoria unitaria
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Geometroidea (Geometrid and Swallowtail Moths)
Family Geometridae (Geometrid Moths)
Subfamily Geometrinae (Emeralds)
Tribe Nemoriini
Genus Nemoria
Species unitaria (Single-lined Emerald - Hodges#7018)
Hodges Number
7018
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Nemoria unitaria – (Packard, 1873)
* phyloygenetic sequence #206375
described in 1873 by Packard, who originally placed it in genus Eunemoria
Size
wingspan 25-34 mm, based on several Internet photos
Identification
Adult: the largest emerald, its distinguishing feature is on the hindwing, where the AM and PM lines join to form a single U-shaped loop; however, in many northern specimens, the line may be so weak that a loop is not distinguishable, leaving a single curved line - as in this photo from Canada; the forewing may also have only a single visible line
Range
western North America: Manitoba to British Columbia, south to California and New Mexico
Habitat
mixed and deciduous woodlands; adults are nocturnal and come to light
Season
adults fly from June to August
Food
unknown, but larvae have been reared to maturity on gooseberry (Ribes sp.)
Print References
Ferguson, D. C., 1985. Moths of America North of Mexico, Fascicle 18.1: p. 26; pl. 1.23-26.(1)
Internet References
Moth Photographers Group - range map, photos of living and pinned adults.
BOLD - Barcode of Life Data Systems - species account with collection map and photos of pinned adults.
pinned adult image by G.G. Anweiler, plus common name reference and species account (Strickland Entomological Museum, U. of Alberta)
pinned adult images plus description and distribution (Friends Central School, Pennsylvania)
pinned adult image (Bruce Walsh, Moths of Southeastern Arizona)
presence in California 4 specimen records with locations and dates (U. of California at Berkeley)
distribution in Canada list of provinces (CBIF)
Works Cited
1.The Moths of America North of Mexico Fascicle 18.1. Geometroidea, Geometridae (Part), Geometrinae
Douglas C. Ferguson . 1985. The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation.