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Photo#1302589
Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis

Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis
Lost Farm, Nantucket, Nantucket County, Massachusetts, USA
June 12, 2016
Size: 1.3 mm
Found under a bark flap made by a Marmara larva.

Images of this individual: tag all
Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis Springtail - Anurophorus near-septentrionalis

Moved
Moved from Anurophorus.

Sorry I didn't collect it!

Moved

Anurophorus sp.
There are 14 described Nearctic species.
The key in Christiansen & Bellinger (1998) starts with 'number of eyes'.
5+5 or 6+6 or 8+8?

 
Eyes
With the resolution of my photos it's hard for me to be sure which dots are eyes and which are setae, but maybe you can make sense of the three shots I just added?

 
Anurophorus nr septentrionalis
seems to be the best match. Thx for posting the extra shots.
There are 8+8 eyes (an anterior group of 5 and a posterior group of 3). 10 species have 8+8 ocelli... But the 5th+6th abdominal segments are fused and there are about 6 transverse rows of setae. This condition matches quite well with septentrionalis. According to C&B (1998) quite common in the USA. But also quite variable. So several (new?) species might be involved... And Potapov (2001:56) says that presence of septentrionalis in North America is hardly possible...
Therefore A. nr septentrionalis is the best match for now.

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