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Photo#1322140
Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus

Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus
El Paso, El Paso County, Texas, USA
December 11, 2016
Size: Approx. 1.9 mm
Found floating in pool. The dorsal setae raised on the metanotum at first sight and in low magnification might look like a single spine or process (as if together form a shark fin). Also the postmarginal vein ends in a "spine".
The ruler is in millimeters.

Images of this individual: tag all
Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus Encyrtidae? - Cheiloneurus

Moved
Moved from Encyrtids.

Comment by Dr. Noyes…
"This is a species of Cheiloneurus. The species is probably described but at the moment the taxonomy of the group to which it belongs is somewhat confused. It is near to Cheiloneurus compressicornis (Ashmead)".

See reference here.

 
Outstanding!
Thank you Ross for pursuing this ID further!

Moved

 
Thank you Ken!
.

Yes - Encyrtid…
The distinctive apical tuft of setae are present in several genera. The postmarginal vein "spine" is an interesting adaptation. Will ask Dr. Noyes to comment on these images.

See reference here.

 
Thank you Ross!
.

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