Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

National Moth Week photos of insects and people. Here's how to add your images.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#132672
Black Carpenter Ant - Camponotus pennsylvanicus? - Formica subsericea

Black Carpenter Ant - Camponotus pennsylvanicus? - Formica subsericea
Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina, USA
July 26, 2007

Moved
Richard Vernier called this one correctly a long time ago -- It is now joined with other images of its species.

Moved

Formica sp. (fusca group) - alate queen
Obviously, my previous comment has remained unnoticed. Maybe the title was misleading, letting believe that I confirmed first identification.
Formica subsericea, one of the few South-Eastern all black species, is a suitable candidate.
It would be very kind of the author of the post - or else someone with editor status - to move this reproductive Formica female from the Camponotus pennsylvanicus page, where she's quite misplaced.

Not sure.
Thi actually looks like an alate queen of a Formica species rather than Camponotus, but I don't know how anyone could tell positively from just this one image....

 
This can be told positively...
based on forewing venation, i.e. presence of a closed discoidal cell which rules out Camponotus. Thus your insight was right: this is an alate female Formica of the fusca group (Although not F. fusca itself, which by the way should not occur that far South) This one is an especially dark species with deeply infuscated wings - that's uncommon in this group where most species have hyaline or nearly hyaline wings.

 
I...
think it's more than a little strange that two of our best experts ID'd an ant to at least genus, even a species-group and nobody bothered to move it. Well, here you go guys...now this image is where it belongs.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.