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Photo#133379
Broad-nosed Weevil - Calomycterus setarius

Broad-nosed Weevil - Calomycterus setarius
Grafton, Ontario, Canada
August 2, 2007
Size: Approx 0.25 inches
I originally posted a picture which Eric Eaton identified as a Broad-nosed weevil (Curculionidae, Entiminae). When I commented that I would like some information regarding lifecycle, food sources etc., Boris Bueche pointed out that higher resolution pictures were required since there were 100's of broad-nosed weevils. This post reflects my best efforts to aquire more detailed pictures given the limitations of lighting in the area and my low end digital camera. Hope this will suffice. Thanks for your help!

Images of this individual: tag all
Broad-nosed Weevil - Calomycterus setarius Broad-nosed Weevil - Calomycterus setarius Broad-nosed Weevil - Calomycterus setarius Broad-nosed Weevil - Calomycterus setarius

Good Sleuthing
Great work. It seems that you folks have nailed the ID of my weevil. The 1930's article is amazingly accurate in terms of the weevil's description and accumulation on white coloured surfaces. I presume the food source is my wife's geraniums in the garden. Given that the population seems to increase every year are there any suggestions on controlling the little critters. Thanks Ernie

I agree
fits well! Size, habitus, nature of body vestiture and vague pattern, and pit in posteriour half of pronotum . . .
Mass development is also an indication for an introduced species, lacking natural enemies. Some information on this species is found in this old article.

Wonder if it might be
Calomycterus setarius - Imported Long-horned Weevil, in the guide here

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