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Photo#1343940
Cynipid oak gall wasp, Disholcaspis quercusvirens

Cynipid oak gall wasp, Disholcaspis quercusvirens
Vero Beach, FL, USA, Indian River County, Florida, USA
February 28, 2017
Size: 2 mm
Two Disholcaspis quercusvirens wasps emerged from a 4 mm diameter spherical gall on the petiole of a leaf on a southern live oak tree

Images of this individual: tag all
Cynipid oak gall wasp, Disholcaspis quercusvirens Cynipid oak gall wasp, Disholcaspis quercusvirens Cynipid oak gall wasp, Disholcaspis quercusvirens

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Gall wasp…
I'm curious as to why you think this may be D. quercusvirens, since all species of Disholcaspis induce galls on White Oaks (not Southern Live Oaks), with the exception of one California species (D. chrysolepidis) which is associated with Quercus chrysolepis (Canyon Live Oak).

See reference here.

 
live oaks are white oaks
Southern live oaks are in the white oak group (Quercus section Quercus, specifically series Virentes). Q. virginiana and Q. geminata are the normal hosts for D. quercusvirens. But I agree that this petiole gall does not look like either gall type of D. quercusvirens.

 
D. quercusvirens is probably correct
The image of the leaf and the location of the gall on the plant both suggest this is indeed a D. quercusvirens. This species is often found on Quercus geminata (Southern Live Oak) and on Q. virginiana (Sandy Live Oak) and both are common in Florida where the bug was found.

You can reference comments on this post for more information: https://bugguide.net/node/view/722327

 
The galls of both generations...
are illustrated in this paper. As summarized on the guide page, one generation makes a small bud gall and the other makes twig galls. Where does this petiole gall fit into the picture?

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