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Photo#1345086
Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus

Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus
Richmond, Virginia, USA
February 18, 2017
Eggs found under loose bark of standing dead tree along trail beside the James River.

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Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus Heteroptera eggs and nymph - Euthyrhynchus floridanus

Moved

The closest match I've found on the guide is

Unfortunately none of mine made it to adulthood.

 
Well
Eggs of Euthyrhynchus floridanus looks similar to your eggs too!

http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/e_floridanus.htm

 
I'm convinced!
Nice, it's cool to solve this mystery. These eggs were pretty common under bark in Richmond over the winter down by the James, so I really wanted to know what they were.

I'll move the images for now, but might end up frassing eventually since there are plenty of good ones already.

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

It's not an ID but...
Looks similar to this hatched eggs (found under loose bark also)


 
Definitely!
Those look very similar, and being found in the same habitat and region they're probably at least very close to these.

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