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Observations on the biology and ecology of two species of Eudiagogus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).
By Kovarik P.W., Burke H.R.
The Southwestern Naturalist 34(2): 196-212., 1989
Cite: 1348554 with citation markup [cite:1348554]
JSTOR

Kovarik P.W., Burke H.R. 1989. Observations on the biology and ecology of two species of Eudiagogus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The Southwestern Naturalist 34(2): 196-212.

Abstract (part)

Eudiagogus rosenschoeldi Fahraeus and Eudiagogus pulcher Fahraeus occur sympatrically and synchronically in Central Texas.

Adults and larvae of E. rosenschoeldi utilize Sesbania vesicaria (Jacq.) Ell. and Sesbania macrocarpa Muhl. as hosts while E. pulcher develops on these as well as Sesbania drummondii (Rydb.) Cory.

Adults feed externally on foliage, and larvae feed on nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Pupation occurs in soil in close proximity to roots of the hosts.

As an indication of the large number of eggs deposited, one field-collected female of E. rosenschoeldi deposited 1,329 eggs during 3 months of confinement in the laboratory.

Large numbers of individuals overwintered under loose bark of standing trees.