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Species Neonympha areolatus - Georgia Satyr - Hodges#4576

 Georgia Satyr - Neonympha areolatus Georgia Satyr - Neonympha areolatus chunk missing - Neonympha areolatus Georgia satyr for NJ data point - Neonympha areolatus Georgia Satyr - Neonympha areolatus Georgia Satyr Butterfly - Neonympha areolatus Georgia Satyr - Neonympha areolatus Georgia Satyr at Cooter's Bog - Neonympha areolatus
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Papilionoidea (Butterflies and Skippers)
Family Nymphalidae (Brush-footed Butterflies)
Subfamily Satyrinae (Satyrs, Morphos and Owls)
Tribe Satyrini (Alpines, Arctics, Nymphs and Satyrs)
Genus Neonympha
Species areolatus (Georgia Satyr - Hodges#4576)
Hodges Number
4576
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Neonympha areolatus (J. E. Smith)
Orig. Comb: Papilio areolatus J. E. Smith, 1797
Size
Wingspan 37-49 mm
Range
se US - MPG, BAMONA
Habitat
Wetlands with sedges
Season
April-September in most of range (two broods), June-July in New Jersey (one brood), yr round in FL
Life Cycle
Larvae feed on sedges.
Remarks
considered by LA and VA to be a Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) (1)(2)