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Photo#1370201
Brachymyrmex patagonicus male reproductive? - Brachymyrmex patagonicus - male

Brachymyrmex patagonicus male reproductive? - Brachymyrmex patagonicus - Male
Rio Rico, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
May 12, 2017
Size: 1.6 mm -to tip of abdomen
There must have been many thousands of these male ants attracted to my mercury vapor and ultraviolet lights that night. They covered the part of my sheet that was flat on the ground.
This University of Florida Extension Publication has photos and an illustration similar to mine.
Coordinates: 31.468040, -110.974227
Elevation: 3,453 ft
Ruler in 1/10 mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Brachymyrmex patagonicus male reproductive? - Brachymyrmex patagonicus - male Brachymyrmex patagonicus male reproductive? - Brachymyrmex patagonicus - male

Moved
Moved from Ants.

*
Brachymyrmex for sure. At present I can't differentiate among the Nearctic species of this genus (which include B. depilis, minutus, musculus, and another introduced species, obscurior). Chris Wilson recently published his thesis work, demonstrating that the male genitalia of Brachymyrmex are valuable for identification purposes. Work on the Nearctic fauna is needed, particularly with reference to males, as their genital morphologies appear to differ starkly among species.

See Wilson (2016): http://jhr.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=8697

 
Great!
Thank you Brendon for sharing your insights. I suggested B. patagonicus simply because, judging from my BG submissions, this species seems to be abundant in southeastern AZ; especially in Rio Rico. Thanks!

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