Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week photos of insects and people. Here's how to add your images.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1380475
Agromyzid in developing columbine fruits - Phytomyza krygeri

Agromyzid in developing columbine fruits - Phytomyza krygeri
Battle Bluff Prairie SNA, Vernon County, Wisconsin, USA
June 5, 2017
06/03/17 Noticed damage to fruits of wild columbine plants growing on a hill prairie; agromyzid puparia inside the fruits, among the developing seeds. Puparia are about the same size and shape as the seeds and could easily be mistaken for them -- but the damage to the exterior of the fruits seems unmistakable. Collected for rearing

Rearing in progress

Images of this individual: tag all
Agromyzid in developing columbine fruits - Phytomyza krygeri Agromyzid in developing columbine fruits - Phytomyza krygeri

Moved
Moved from Phytomyza.

I had two adults emerge yesterday from the seed capsules I collected last June, and they look like the flies illustrated in Owen's paper.

Moved
Moved from Leaf Miner Flies.

Definitely something interesting... good luck with the rearing!

 
Thanks, Charley
Nothing yet, fingers crossed.

 
Possibly Phytomyza krygeri
Owen Lonsdale has cited this photo in his paper documenting this European species in North America for the first time. I found similar damage to columbine across the road from my house, which is also mentioned. The puparia apparently overwinter in the pods and adults emerge the following spring; if we're unable to rear them, the best bet is to look for adults on flowers.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.