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Comparative life cycles of four species of predatory stink bugs.
By Richman DB, Whitcomb WH.
Florida Entomologist 61(3): 113-119., 1978
Cite: 1383555 with citation markup [cite:1383555]
Full PDF

Richman DB, Whitcomb WH. 1978. Comparative life cycles of four species of predatory stink bugs. Florida Entomologist 61(3): 113-119.

Abstract

Four species of asopine stink bugs, Alcaeorrhynchus grandis (Dallas), Euthyrhynchus floridanus (L.), Podisus maculiventris (Say), and Stiretrus anchorago (Fab.), were reared in the laboratory under identical conditions. Two groups of each species were maintained; one under simulated Florida field conditions at a variable temperature ranging from 18-30dC, averaging approximately 26dC, and the second at a constant temperature of 27dC. The photoperiod was 14 L:10 D for all groups, and all were fed at the same time with the same larval instars of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hubner), and the soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker). At the given temperatures P. maculiventris and S. anchorago completed their life cycles in 1 month, while A. grandis and E. floridanus took 2 months. The egg stages lasted approximately 5 days for P. maculiventris, 6 days for S. anchorago, 16 days for A. grandis, and 19 days for E. floridanus. All species were reared through at least 1 generation from eggs laid by laboratory-reared individuals.