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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Genus Celatoria

fly from spotted cucumber beetle - Celatoria diabroticae fly from spotted cucumber beetle - Celatoria diabroticae - female fly from spotted cucumber beetle - Celatoria diabroticae - female fly from spotted cucumber beetle - Celatoria diabroticae - female fly from spotted cucumber beetle - Celatoria diabroticae - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon (Calyptratae)
Superfamily Oestroidea
Family Tachinidae (Parasitic Flies)
Subfamily Exoristinae
Tribe Blondeliini
Genus Celatoria
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Celatoria Coquillett, 1890
Chaetophleps Coquillett, 1895
Numbers
Two species north of Mexico
Identification
Females have a long, piercing ovipositor that ends near a bristly projection below tergite 3.

Some other Blondeliini have a similar ovipositor but lack the projections on tergite 3.
Range
Southern Canada to southern Brazil(1)
Food
Parasitoid of Galerucinae
Remarks
"Bussart (1937) described and illustrated the manner in which the female of setosa (Coquillett) captures an adult striped cucumber beetle in flight and injects a 1st-instar larva into its haemocoel. Hosts include the striped cucumber beetle, Acalymma vittata (Fabricius), as well as species of Diabrotica and related genera."(1)
Print References
Bussart, J. E. 1937. The bionomics of Chaetophleps setosa Coquillett (Diptera: Tachinidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America 30:285-293.
Works Cited
1.A Taxonomic Conspectus of the Blondeliini of North and Central America and the West Indies
D. M. Wood. 1985. Memoirs of the Entomological Society of Canada.