Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#141029
Bumble Bee Mimic - Hadromyia grandis - male

Bumble Bee Mimic - Hadromyia grandis - Male
Bonney Lake, Pierce County, Washington, USA
June 28, 2007
Criorhina?

Images of this individual: tag all
Bumble Bee Mimic - Hadromyia grandis - male Bumble Bee Mimic - Hadromyia grandis - male Bumble Bee Mimic - Hadromyia grandis - male Bumble Bee Mimic - Hadromyia grandis - male

Moved
Moved from Pocota bomboides.

I see
Nobody commented on my comment yet, but still I think this one should be replaced to Hadromyia grandis, male!
I looked at some specimens of Pocota bomboides in the museum of Naturalis in Leiden , the Netherlands, and that species looks very different!
Greetings,

 
Ok Gerard, you win.... The mi
Ok Gerard, you win.... The mid tibia spur is very characteristic and I just did not notice it when I ID it as Pocota. And I had a Hadromyia grandis in my collection, which looked different, because it is a Brachypalpus (Crioprora) alopex.... Great flies, I wish I would find them....

 
Dear Martin
If I wanted to win something I'd go to the local casino more often....:-))
Just kidding, it's just that I like Bugguide a lot and I try to make things right for matters I know a little bit about.
Bugguide teaches me a lot, and my limited knowledge about American fauna improves every time I see something new in the guide!
Thanks for your help,
Greetings

 
That is exactly how I feel ab
That is exactly how I feel about bugguide... It is not so important who gets the ID right, it is just important that in the end somebody gets it right...Even after living here for 10 years, I still have the feeling I know the European fauna a bit better (partially because there are better and more keys out and nearly every European species excists on pictures...) But the Nearctic fauna is very interesting and this is just a perfect example of an amazing species (and so easy to identify when you know it)...

Not Pocota, but a male Hadromyia grandis
Dear guys and girls, I don't want to spoil the party, but this is not Pocota! If you follow the manual of Nearctic Diptera, you'll come across key number 86, where they ask about the apical section of R4+5.
This is quite long, in Pocota it should be much shorter.
Following the key from there, you'll end up with a male of Hadromyia grandis, because of the big ventral subbasal spur on this male's middle femur!
So that's what it is, a male Hadromyia grandis!
Greetings

Moved
Moved from Syrphid Flies.

Moved
Moved from Mallota.

Moved
Moved from Syrphid Flies.

 
It is surely not Mallota... I
It is surely not Mallota... I still did not figure out what it is, but the wing veination is clearly showing that it is not Mallota, not even an Eristalini

 
Pocota bomboides?
Martin,

I think this might be Pocota bomboides, a species of the western USA.

David Campbell

 
Ahhh that sounds like a good
Ahhh that sounds like a good guess! This is a rare species, but I am sure you are right!

Wing veins
Do direct things off into the netherlands in the bottom of the key. I will buy Criorhina. Quite a few species in the west apparently. Damn cool fly.

Awesome pics... I do not have
Awesome pics... I do not have my collection and my Lit with me, so I can not come up with a name, but it is something rare!
Hope I can soon give an ID...

 
Thanks,
and I should add that the finger is of a small eight year old girl.

 
Finger
A cute, plump little finger. Is she eight already?
Could it be Mallota?

 
Nope, Mallota has the "dip" i
Nope, Mallota has the "dip" in the vein, but this one here is straight, it is closer to Hardomyia and Criorhina... Something which lives in dead trees and something I never collected myself, although it seems to be very tame!

 
Yes very tame,
its behavior was quite entertaining. It was quite reluctant to fly, much like a butterfly after it has just emerged from chrysalis. It was not at all aggressive or defensive while we handled it (probably 20 min or more). When it did fly it only went short jumps of 15 feet or so. It's funny to think that before my bugging days I would have thought this was a stinging bumble bee and missed all this fun. :)

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.