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Interested in a 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico?

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

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Species Graphopsocus cruciatus

Psocoptera - Graphopsocus cruciatus Adult Bark Louse - Graphopsocus cruciatus fly thing? - Graphopsocus cruciatus Barklouse - Graphopsocus cruciatus - female Barklouse - Graphopsocus cruciatus narrow barklouse? - Graphopsocus cruciatus An Aphid Species? - Graphopsocus cruciatus Gray barklouse - Graphopsocus cruciatus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Psocodea (Barklice, Booklice, and Parasitic Lice)
Suborder Psocomorpha
Infraorder Caeciliusetae
Family Stenopsocidae (Narrow Barklice)
Genus Graphopsocus
Species cruciatus (Graphopsocus cruciatus)
Explanation of Names
Graphopsocus cruciatus (Linnaeus 1768)
Identification
wing markings and vein patterns distinctive
Range
"Thought to have been introduced in the 1930 to both the east and west coast from Europe or Asia. After quickly spreading up and down both coasts it is now slowly moving inland." - Philip Careless
Food
microflora on tree leaves
Life Cycle
Overwinter as adults
Remarks
Females tend to be brachypterous, males macropterous (Greenwood 1988)