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Photo#141691
Casebearer pupa - Exema canadensis

Casebearer pupa - Exema canadensis
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
August 12, 2007
Size: about 5 mm
Collected with sweepnet from any of a number of herbaceous flowering plants. I placed it on a sprig of goldenrod in a bottle of water, placing some aluminum foil closely around the stem to prevent the larva from dropping into the water. Two weeks later, noting that the larva was no longer crawling around, I decided to remove it from the goldenrod and examine it. The case was glued tightly to the plant. I suspected the larva had pupated inside and was determined to find out. Here is what the once-opening of the case looked like when I detatched it.

Images of this individual: tag all
Casebearer pupa - Exema canadensis Casebearer pupa - Exema canadensis Casebearer pupa - Exema canadensis Casebearer pupa - Exema canadensis Casebearer pupa - Exema canadensis Casebearer imago - Exema canadensis Casebearer imago - Exema canadensis Casebearer imago - Exema canadensis

Moved
Moved from Exema.

Moved

Chlamisus foveolatus
If the generic ID is correct, then these must be C. foveolatus as that's the only species that ranges that far north. (1)

 
i believe this to be an Exema rather
*

 
I assume that's based on the adult...
But other clues seem to agree with your assessment. I showed an image of an identical larval case to Christopher G. Brown, who studies cryptocephalines, and he said it looked very much like an Exema, because of the "nipple" at the apex (which is the retained fecal covering from the egg). He noted that Exema spp. prefer goldenrod...

Moved
Moved from Warty Leaf Beetles.

Moved
Moved from The Casebearers.

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