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Photo#141718
Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus

Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
August 24, 2007
Size: about 4.4 mm
Came to MV lights on warm, humid night (about the only conditions under which I run my MV lights). In these shots the beetle is in water, its natural element.

Images of this individual: tag all
Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus Dryopid beetle - Helichus lithophilus

Moved
Moved from Helichus.

 
Thanks for the det., Tim.
I'll make note in my own files.

Moved

Antennae
Did you check the antennae to make sure? Just curious.

 
Okay,
I'm posting antenna shots.

 
Good idea
At first I assumed it was the same species I'd posted before based on body shape. I think you're suggesting it might not even be in the same family.

I was a little peeved that it never stuck its antennae out. I took some dry shots but apparently didn't see anything worth saving. It's time for a postmortem shot or two :-)

 
Dryopid it is
The other possibility is Lutrochidae, but the large second antennal segment is diagnostic for Dryopidae. Those additional shots are helpful in seeing this.

 
Gee,
now I know what I'm looking at. I thought those projecting large lobes were terminal palpomeres. They are the large second antennomere :-)

 
Helichus
Should be the only genus in your area.

 
Just now checking UNH checklist
(and catching up on some old email) I see you are right. Moving to Helichus.

Moved
Moved from Helichus.

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