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Photo#1420910
 Linne's Annual Cicada - Neotibicen linnei

Linne's Annual Cicada - Neotibicen linnei
Clinton, Anderson County, Tennessee, USA
July 20, 2017

linnei
all traits evident

 
line
Thanks for the help on this!

Moved
Moved from Dog-day Cicada.

Perhaps this is Neotibicen linnei...
Note the strongly bowed costal margin (wing edge). That trait is often more closely attributed to Neotibicen linnei rather than Neotibicen canicularis.

Also, I think that N. linnei is more common/frequently encountered in Tennessee as opposed to N. canicualris.

Here's an example of linnei; note the bowing ("bent" wing edge)



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Neotibicen pruinosus is another abundant species in your area that is closely allied with both N. linnei and canicularis. It too often possesses strong costal margin bowing, although maybe not as consistently as N. linnei. I would rule out pruinsosus though due to the absence of major pruinosity (male Neotibicen pruinosus cicadas usually exhibit a streak of pruinosity behind the wing base/tymbal cover).

Note the white pruinosity streak in this male pruinsus:



This is tricky ID.

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