Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week photos of insects and people. Here's how to add your images.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1421335
Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male

Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - Male
Nogales, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
August 10, 2017
Size: 5 mm
I discovered this tick on the back of my head, before a bite (or so I think), after going to the field looking for bugs. Most likely location where the tick caught a ride on my backpack: Coordinates 31.337273, -110.962122

After sharing these images with several epidemiologists in the Arizona Department of Health Services and the CDC in Georgia, I was told that this species is no longer recognized as A. triste. Hayley D. Belisle-Yaglom, Senior Vector-borne & Zoonotic Disease Epidemiologist with the Arizona Department of Health Services said: “This is a male Amblyomma maculatum. Please note that we are no longer calling these triste. You may refer to Allerdice et al. (2017)".

A professor at Georgia Southern University commented: "After looking at these images, I would call this Amblyomma maculatum and not A. triste. All molecular work indicate that this tick does not differ genetically from A. maculatum from Georgia."

A respected tick expert told me: "The Arizona ticks belong to the “Amblyomma maculatum” group, which includes A. maculatum, A. triste, and A. tigrinum. The taxonomic status of species of the Amblyomma maculatum group is under scrutiny. The occurrence of A. triste in Arizona has been reported, but not confirmed yet. Minor morphological differences between the Arizona tick and both, A. maculatum and A. triste, have been recorded and are presently being reassessed by molecular analysis".

Images of this individual: tag all
Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male Amblyomma maculatum or A. triste? That is the question. - Amblyomma maculatum - male

Moved
Moved from Amblyomma triste.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.