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Photo#142808
Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - male

Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - Male
Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
September 3, 2007
Size: 3.2cm, 5.1cm with wings
T. canicularis or T. linnei or T. pruinosa? Or perhaps another one altogether?

Also, I've included images of the sex organs in the hopes that someone knows how to tell the sex of this cicada.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - male Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - male Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - male Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - male Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - male Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - male Tibicen - Megatibicen resh - male

Tibicen
You need measurements to tell the species. The male genitalia just tell you it is one of the largest species, such as T. auletes, and not any of the smaller species you list. (Turning it over so you could see the opercula - flaps covering the ear drums - would also help in recognizing the species).

 
Tibicen resh
Your measurements and the width of your finger (about 17 mm, the width of the cicada's head), plus the hump-backed thorax with whitish margins, and the rather short wings, combine to give the species identity. This is a greener specimen than the other photograph already posted for this species; but cicadas are sometimes variable in color.

 
Size
I have added another image taken of this specimen, in which he is conveniently positioned along my finger for size reference. I have measured my finger and computed his size, which I think is accurate to within a couple millimeters. As for the opercula, I'm not quite sure what I'm looking for. I took a few shots of the underside of his "face," however my camera flash was not my friend that night. I'll add the best shot, in case that helps.

It appears to be a male, sinc
It appears to be a male, since an ovipositor is absent.

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