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Species Ripiphorus epinomiae

New Rhipiphorus...and one that can actually be identified with confidence! :-) - Ripiphorus epinomiae - female Interesting Rhipiphorus...that can actually be identified with confidence! :-) - Ripiphorus epinomiae - female Interesting Rhipiphorus...that can actually be identified with confidence! :-) - Ripiphorus epinomiae - female Interesting Rhipiphorus...that can actually be identified with confidence! :-) - Ripiphorus epinomiae - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Cucujiformia)
Superfamily Tenebrionoidea (Fungus, Bark, Darkling and Blister Beetles)
Family Ripiphoridae (Wedge-shaped Beetles)
Subfamily Ripiphorinae
Genus Ripiphorus
Species epinomiae (Ripiphorus epinomiae)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Rhipiphorus epinomiae Linsley & MacSwain, 1950
Explanation of Names
Multiple collections of this species were associated with the bee host species Nomia (Epinomia) nevadensis Cresson.
Identification
From the key in Linsley & MacSwain(1)(1951), diagnostic characters for the female are:
1) First segment of posterior tarsus obliquely truncate at apex, usually elevated and shorter than following segments combined.2) Head and thorax dark, abdomen wholly or partially reddish or yellow.3) Antennae ten-segmented; pronotum, except smooth areas, very densely punctate; posterior tarsal claw with seven inner teeth. 5-8 mn.
The male, as in the female, has the first segment of posterior tarsus obliquely truncate at apex and shorter than following segments combined...however, the abdomen is blackish-brown; the antennae are straw-yellow; and the posterior tarsi have 17 teeth on inner margin of the claw. Body length of the male is ~6 mm.
Remarks
Original description on first page of Linsley & MacSwain(1950)...see "Print References" below.
Print References
E. G. Linsley & J. W MacSwain (1950). New western species of Rhipiphoridae (Coleoptera). The Wasmann Journal of Biology, 8(2)229-239. (Full Text here...scroll down right column to select)
Works Cited
1.The Rhipiphoridae of California (Coleptera)
Linsley E.G., MacSwain J.W. 1951. Bull. Calif. Insect Surv. 1: 79-88.