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Photo#1438016
Mason bee vs. Robber Fly - Mallophora fautrix

Mason bee vs. Robber Fly - Mallophora fautrix
San Diego (coastal), San Diego County, California, USA
September 9, 2017
Hello, I see this fuzzy little guy in my garden almost every other day. He likes to sit near me while I water (on edge of tomato cage or arbor, seemingly getting sun). He sits for a min or so, then takes off, and doesn't seem to mind if I am very close. I have a large vegetable and butterly garden, lots of blooms, and I've seen a few female mason bees on blooms before, I assumed this to be a male mason bee. After a little more reading, I wondered if it might instead be a robber fly (we do have a lot of other honey bees and yellow jackets here also). I would appreciate any help identifying! Respectfully, Lyndsy

Images of this individual: tag all
Mason bee vs. Robber Fly - Mallophora fautrix Mason bee vs. Robber Fly - Mallophora fautrix Mason bee vs. Robber Fly - Mallophora fautrix

Robber Fly
My guess is it's a robber fly. Genus Mallophra or Laphria mimic bees.

 
Hi John, Thank you so muc
Hi John,

Thank you so much! My first time using this site, Im not sure if this is the final answer because below your comment was another John, and he said my request was moved. I'm guessing that means it's a robber fly! Just wanted to check, I appreciate you looking into this, and taking your time to comment. What a cool site!

Respectfully,
Lyndsy

 
..
Mr.Ascher identified the exact species a couple of minutes before me, so he deserves the credit. He also moved your images to the robber fly guide page.

Info page on robber fly Genus Mallophora: http://bugguide.net/node/view/6695

I am a pretty big fan of this site as well. (just found out about it this year!). I look forward to seeing more of your photos.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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