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Photos of insects and people from the 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico, July 20-24

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Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

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Family Aphrophoridae - Typical Spittlebugs

large spittlebug - Aphrophora brown spittlebug - Philaenus spumarius Spittlebug Nymph - Lepyronia gibbosa Spittle Bug? Don't know its breakfast menu Late-instar nymph - Aphrophora Aphrophoridae (SpittlebugX), on Dandelion Meadow Spittlebug - Philaenus spumarius
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Auchenorrhyncha (True Hoppers)
Infraorder Cicadomorpha
Superfamily Cercopoidea (Spittlebugs)
Family Aphrophoridae (Typical Spittlebugs)
Explanation of Names
Aphrophoridae Amyot & Serville 1843
Spittlebug: nymphs surround themselves with a frothy mass that resembles spittle
Numbers
~30 spp. in 7 genera in our area,> ~930 spp. in ~160 genera total(1); genus not yet in the guide: Paraphilaenus Vilbaste 1962, P. parallelus (Stearns 1918) ON-WI-?IL
Identification
Key to genera and most spp. in(3)
Range
worldwide
Life Cycle
After the nymph molts for the final time, the resulting adult insect leaves the mass of "spittle" and moves about actively. The "spittle" is derived from a fluid voided from the anus and from a mucilaginous substance excreted by epidermal glands. Nymphs wander away from their spittle masses, and either start new ones, or enter those of other nymphs. Aphrophora nymphs hold the record, of one spittle mass over a foot long containing about 100 individuals! --A.K.G. Hamilton