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Photo#145080
California Jumping Gall Wasp - Neuroterus saltatorius - female

California Jumping Gall Wasp - Neuroterus saltatorius - Female
Mt Diablo State Park, Contra Costa County, California, USA
August 10, 2007
Size: 1mm (each gall)
On Quercus lobata (valley oak). These are the summer, unisexual generation galls.

Images of this individual: tag all
California Jumping Gall Wasp - Neuroterus saltatorius - female California Jumping Gall Wasp - Neuroterus saltatorius - female

Has anything emerged from these...
...or the ones found on the blue oak leaves? Of course, they would parasites of the jumping gall wasp, but I have the impression that many different wasp species parasite these galls.

As usual your photos are far better than the reference photos I have seen on the internet. I've never seen a jumping gall before, though now that I know what to look for I may just find some!

 
not these ...
I didn't bring any of these particular galls home to raise. I do have galls from about 10 other gall wasp species at my house though. So far it's been mostly parasitoids or inquilines that have emerged, except for two cases where I got adult cynipids. (Yes, there are many species of wasps that parasitize galls.)

I want to make a web page with photos of galls + the cynipids that come out of them + the parasitoids that come out of them + the inquilines that come out of them: a case study that I can add on to as new critters emerge. It's something I've been wanting to do, so I will do it eventually. I think it would be a nice visual way to get a view of "life on an oak tree" that most people don't know about.

It's easy to find galls once you know what you're looking for. Coast live oaks (leaves are on all winter) have some galls now. They have stem galls as well. In the summer blue oaks and valley oaks have great galls -- just look closely and you'll see them! Some trees are more well-galled than others. Those are especially fun to find.

 
The gall pages would be a great resource
I am really amazed by the entire process in galls and alternating generations of wasps. I read a very good description of jumping galls on a website called Wayne's World. It did lack pictures of the bisexual generation male and female wasps, and also the slightly larger type of gall that produces that generation. But it seemed very well researched, perfect for someone like myself who was completely unfamiliar with them.

I've seen many acorn to apple sized galls this year, but was completely unaware that very small ones even existed!

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