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Photo#1460609
Male, Yucca Plant Bug? - Halticotoma - male

Male, Yucca Plant Bug? - Halticotoma - Male
Nogales, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
October 27, 2017
Size: 2.8 mm
Found on yucca plants
Coordinates: 31.334229, -110.966065

Thomas Henry viewed these images, checked the location, and said this is not H. valida. Their light-colored tibiae reveal them as a different Halticotoma species.

Images of this individual: tag all
Male, Yucca Plant Bug? - Halticotoma - male Male, Yucca Plant Bug? - Halticotoma - male Male, Yucca Plant Bug? - Halticotoma - male Male, Yucca Plant Bug? - Halticotoma - male Male, Yucca Plant Bug? - Halticotoma - male

Moved
Moved from Yucca Plant Bug.

Moved
Moved from Plant Bugs.

Moved
Moved from Plant Bugs.

Sorry about that! I didn't notice they were already here.

It does resemble the Yucca Plant Bug, but none of the specimens in the Guide have black and yellow legs.

 
It looks like you were right after all
and Thomas Henry commented on their leg color too.

 
Dr. Jason Botz inspected the genitalia of the males
and found them to be H. valida

 
Yes, I noticed that too
but didn't know what else it could be. I imagine the male, female, and nymph submitted today are all the same species because they were clustered together, but that's just me making assumptions again.

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