Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#146286
7009728-Spilomyia - Spilomyia liturata - female

7009728-Spilomyia - Spilomyia liturata - Female
Mt Graham, Arizona, USA
June 30, 2007
Size: ~3/4"

Images of this individual: tag all
7009728-Spilomyia - Spilomyia liturata - female 7009728-Spilomyia - Spilomyia liturata - female 7009728-Spilomyia - Spilomyia liturata - female 7009728-Spilomyia - Spilomyia liturata - female

Moved
Moved from Spilomyia.

Very nice photos!
You wouldn't happen to have one that shows the apical tergites (last abdominal segments dorsally)?

 
This is as close as I have to
This is as close as I have to it.

 
Spilomyia liturata -
This is what this keys to with your additional images. Though rather similar to S. interrupta, the yellow abdominal bands are only faintly interrupted in the middle, and there's less yellow on the lower side of the thorax.
It might be interesting to add that the plant, from which this fly is taking nectar, is a Ceanothus (looks like Fendler's Buckbrush, C. fendleri).
Re. location, is it possible that you were in the Graham Peak area (San Juan Mountains, CO)? I know Mt. Graham in AZ, but can't find a Mt. Graham in CO.

S. longicornus, do you think?
I do. Several have been posted recently, and they look like yours.

 
Either that or
interrupta. I can't tell them apart but interrupta is found in the west while longicornis is in the east.
Let us hope that somebody tell us what this one is.

 
Hi Beatriz,
there are more spp. out west than interrupta , though not all of them apply. It may well be citima , but I'm not sure yet; too tired for now.

 
I'm pretty sure I have it figured out.
E. interrupta has bigger "interruptions" on the broken yellow stripes:

Also, markings on the thorax are a bit bolder, at least on Hartmut's specimen. (We don't have a lot to go on here.)

 
So it is changed to interrupt
So it is changed to interruptus?
AZ is in the west.
I have many other views if necessary.

 
Views
Yes, a couple of more views wouldn't hurt.
I keep hoping that an expert would step in.

 
Wing venation and a side view might help
I think we can compare veins with photos already here, but don't know if there's any difference at species level. A side view might be used with this S. longicornus info, but we have nothing similar for the other species.
http://www.canacoll.org/Diptera/Staff/Skevington/Syrphidae/Spilomyia/Spilomyia2.jpg

 
I still say S. longicornus
Appearance is no contest. As to range, there's at least one sighting in Oklahoma, so Arizona doesn't seem much of a stretch to me. And as a Bug Guide sage once put it "If it flies, all bets are off." Just this week, an Orange County sighting of a dragonfly (Turquoise-tipped Darner) extended its range from southeast Arizona to costal California.

But, hey, I'm no expert.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.