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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Genus Lichenomima

Mouse-like Barklouse - Lichenomima Mouse-like Barklouse - Lichenomima Mouse-like Barklouse - Lichenomima lugens Barklouse nymph - Lichenomima lugens Mouse-like Barklouse - Lichenomima Mouse-like Barklouse - Lichenomima Lichenomima? - Lichenomima Small bark louse or moth  - Lichenomima
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Psocodea (Barklice, Booklice, and Parasitic Lice)
Suborder Psocomorpha
Infraorder Psocetae
Family Myopsocidae (Mouse-like Barklice)
Genus Lichenomima
Explanation of Names
Lichenomima Enderlein 1910
Numbers
3 named spp. in NA(1) + a dozen unnamed, ca. 40 worldwide(2)[cite:370484]
Range
worldwide and across NA(1)(2)
Habitat
Rock outcrops(1)
Remarks
There are only three names in the North American literature but some 12 species, readily distinguishable on male genitalic characters, but not so readily on female characters. The types of the named species, in the MCZ, are females. I examined them years ago and set the problem aside for future work. I am fairly certain about L. lugens in the north, a small, compact, very dark species, but in the south, more than one species fits that description. Hopefully, I can deal with the whole problem seriously some time during the next few months. --E.L. Mockford, pers.comm. to =v= 13.ix.2013