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Photo#1473500
Alydus? - Dacerla mediospinosa

Alydus? - Dacerla mediospinosa
Meadow along Fallen Leaf Lake Rd., El Dorado County, California, USA
July 16, 2017

Images of this individual: tag all
Alydus? - Dacerla mediospinosa Alydus? - Dacerla mediospinosa

Moved
Moved from Dacerla.

Thanks, Aaron. Ken wrote a number of other supporting comments on his iNat observations from Sagehen, and I think it's a strong case. I believe this is an adult female

Northern CA station here suggests species D. mediospinosa
...per the treatment in Carvalho & Usinger(1957). Moreover, assuming this is an adult, the short hemelytra with no grooves/sutures/veins separating corium, cuneus, and membrane give furthur support to that ID.

For more info, see remarks accompanying post below:

 

...and references on the D. mediospinosa info page.

Moved tentatively
Moved from Plant Bugs.

On second thought...
the females in Orectoderus are brachypterous, and the hemelytra don't extend so far back

So, back to Dacerla? https://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=7777+7777+0910+0091

 
Let's see...
...what WonGon (our mirid expert) has to say. :)

 
I suspect Dacerla.
^^

I think you're onto it
Antennae best fit female obliquus: http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/bitstream/handle/2246/6093/N3703.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

This is similar too, but appears that the pronotum peaks much further forward in mine: https://bugguide.net/node/view/1160381/bgimage

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Thinking something along these lines:


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